8. You can always use your "Fuck It" Card.

This is a lesson that came from a crash course in life, but I didn’t have the words for until I met a career advisor in Nepal. I had quit my job against all reasonable wisdom earlier that year; I left a position at what would be a reasonable place to begin escalating my corporate career in order to travel and volunteer. 

My last day of work, January 2015. 

My last day of work, January 2015. 

When I was in Nepal, I debated whether returning to my same industry or continuing to travel was the right next step. Heidi told me that whatever decision I made wasn’t set in stone--that I always had the power to revamp my life. Though sometimes it seems hard--social, familial, or self-imposed pressures may make us hesitant to pull out of situations that are no longer serving us--change is always an option. It is, after all, the natural order of things.

This is something that comes up frequently in my travels. Whether it is making a decision to leave a city that no longer suits me, ending a relationship that doesn’t bring out the best in me, or throwing my fears to the wind in order to embrace a new adventure, I do my best to actively make decisions. This requires a lot of self-evaluation; I am the only person I can expect to be in touch with my own needs, which means I have to be assertive in satisfying them. The results of such choices are sometimes tumultuous, but the glorious thing about this concept is that even through the turmoil we have the power to enact change. 

Jaisalmer, India, July 2015. The person I was in January and the one I was in July feel lifetimes away from each other. 

Jaisalmer, India, July 2015. The person I was in January and the one I was in July feel lifetimes away from each other. 

Take that as you will--as a call to political activism, body positivity, quitting your job--as long as you have faith in yourself to come out on the other side. 

 

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